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Lecture Series: Memory politics and minority management in contemporary Europe

Flyer Lecture Series: Memory politics and minority management in contemporary Europe

Flyer Lecture Series: Memory politics and minority management in contemporary Europe

News vom 01.04.2021

Lecture Series:

Memory politics and minority management in contemporary Europe

 

Organized in the framework of the Berlin University Alliance Project “Beyond Social Cohesion. Global Repertoires of Living Together” (RePLITO)

By Prof. Schirin Amir-Moazami and Dr. Hannah Tzuberi, Institute of Islamic Studies, FU Berlin)

Thursday from 6.00 to 8.00 p.m. (except for Tuesday 4 Mai, 4.00 to 6.00 pm) 

The lecture series will be held in a digital format.

Please sign up here.

 

Memory of the genocidal annihilation of European Jewry permeates the (German) political present and informs collective and individual political emotions. It is specifically in relation to this genocide, today named the Holocaust, that the question of historical justice interposes itself also at the site of national self-articulation, coming afore in questions such as ‘What kind of policies exactly does or should the acknowledgement and memorialization of the Holocaust entertain? How does or should historical responsibility materialize?’ Over the past decades, the representation of memory work as an exemplar model of ‘coming to terms’ with its genocidal past has become diffracted. Questions related to the subterranean, disavowed continuities and recursions of racial violence press themselves onto the foreground. Moreover, the relationship of Holocaust memoralization to other memories of violence in past and present, such as colonialism and imperialism has gained salience recently: What is remembered, and what is forgotten, strategically pushed away or occluded, so that the present appears as radically different from the past?

 

This lecture-series and MA-seminar takes up these questions in order to situate contemporary “minority managements” of Muslims and Jews within a broader web of oftentimes disavowed dependencies and entanglements: How and why do certain forms of subjugation live on in a liberal democracy like Germany, either with Jewish communities, or with other minoritized communities, especially Muslims in Europe? How do previous forms of racialization of Jewish minorities gain reconfigured currency today with regard to Muslim and Jewish communities? What can we make of the simultaneousness of a “boom” of things Jewish in post-1989 Germany and the raising antagonism/violence against both Muslims and Jews? How is desire and disgust, directed unevenly at contemporary Jews and Muslims, entangled with memory/forgetting of past desire and disgust? How, when and why do genocidal atrocities and relations of injustice become inscribed into the present, allowing for some forms of contemporary violence to pass either unnoticed, or to circumvent linkage with the memory of past violence?

 

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ZMO
Fachbereich Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaften